Posts Tagged ‘frugal’

How much does it cost to bake your own bread?

Now we’re making our own bread I thought it’d be worth working out how much cheaper / more expensive it is than just buying standard wholemeal bread.

So here’s the standard pricing of all the ingredients – I haven’t started looking for cheap bulk supplies yet so these are just from Sainsbury’s.

310 ml semi-skimmed milk 20.77p
225g Strong White Bread Flour 10.35p
225g Strong Wholemeal Bread Flour 14.85p
1 tsp salt 0.2p
3 tsp sugar 1.49p
25 g butter 7.5p
2x7g sachets of dried yeast 19.75p
Electricity 3.14p
Total 78p

So in total it costs 78p, which is about the same price as a Sainsbury’s wholemeal loaf. Cost wise then it doesn’t make much difference – as long as you’re not making a separate journey to buy your bread, as once you start your car up the cost difference would be substantial!

I’ll keep doing it because it tastes great, means we never run out, and it’s a good skill to have learnt for leaner times. I might also look for cheaper bulk ingredients.

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Chicken Soup with a Soul

I have often remembered the chicken broth my mother used to make when I was a child. In those days of frugality, making a broth was the best way to ensure that full use was got out of a chicken – that every last morsel of meat was gleaned off the bones and every ounce of goodness was extracted from the carcass, and was put to delicious use. And yes, it was delicious!

 Of course, in the fast-paced lives that we so often live in our young adulthood, making broth never seemed to be worth the bother. But my husband has recently been ‘educating’ me on the expected ravages that will descend upon the world post-peak-oil, and how we will need to become much less wasteful with our food. Plus, I thought, my two-year-old daughter will love it. So, despite the risk of irretrievably entrenching myself into the stereotyped stay-at-home mum rôle, I decided this evening to have a go.

 So here’s a rough guide to how to make it: 

  • Put the chicken carcass into a pan
  • Add an onion, cut into eighths
  • Cover with water and bring to the boil
  • Season with salt and pepper and a good shake of mixed herbs
  • Boil for 3-4 hours until the carcass has fallen apart and all the meat dropped off the bones
  • Extract the bones (that’s the real fiddly part. There are no short-cuts to getting into it with your fingers)

 If you want, you can make a proper meal by adding chopped vegetables towards the end of the cooking time, but my mother’s version was always unadulterated.

 As I write, the wonderful aromas of chicken and onions are filling the house. The hard part is waiting for all that cooking time before you can eat the soup!

 I may try amending the recipe to give it a more modern, cosmopolitan flavour in the form of Asian-style chicken noodle soup (I’m sure that the addition of noodles alone will not be sufficient!). Perhaps a further post will be necessary. Must go now – tasting to do!

 PS – Of course! Here’s how chicken broth fits into our post-peak-oil lives. Picture our (as yet hypothetical) wood-burning stove, blazing away all day in the winter to heat our rooms, with a pot of broth simmering away on top…